Well #5 Rehab – December 2016 – February 2017

Water Supply Situation

Well #5 Being Prepared for Service

A new pump, motor, drop pipe, and pitless adapter have been installed and tested. Well #5 is being sanitized, flushed and tested before putting it back in service within the next week or two.

Updated: 2/5/2017 10 AM


Well #5 Key Part Replaced

Our well service company (Rodgers) replaced the pitless adapter at the top of the well and tested it with satisfactory results. So all the rehab work is complete and we are ready to put the well back together. With the time to fill the excavation, pour a new slab, reinstall the pump and motor (500 deep) and disinfect the well, we expect to have the well back in service by mid-February.

Updated: 1/24/2017 8:30 PM


Well #5 Needs Replacement Part

The video inspection of well #5 shows that the cleaning is complete and further work is not needed deep down. It appears that most of the rust was caused by the pitless adapter leaking, at the top of the well.

Several tests were run of the pitless adapter, and all failed with it leaking. The plan is to replace both parts of the pitless adapter, which will require digging about 6′ down to the part welded to the casing. This will probably take one or two weeks.

Updated: 1/19/2017 9:30 AM


Well #5 Initial Rehab and Video Inspection Complete

Our well service contractor has finished the well cleaning and did another inspection. The video is being reviewed to see what further work is needed.

Updated: 1/13/2017 4 PM


Well #5 Rehab Work Underway

Beginning on Monday, January 9, 2017, our well service contractor began the next steps in getting the well back in service. This consists of bushing the inside of the casing and screen to remove mineral build-up and scale. This will take most of the week, followed by a video inspection on January 16, 2017.

Updated: 1/9/2017 6:45 PM


Well #5 Plan

It looks like we will not have well #5 back in service until early mid late January 2017.

A careful review of the video inspection showed heavy scaling (rusting) of the casing from 5′ to 20′ below the top, and then gradually improving below 20′. It appears that was caused by the pitless adapter leaking, causing the casing to rust. (The pitless adapter is the part that connects the top of the drop pipe, which carries pumped water, to the piping into the well house, through the casing. It is about 5 feet below the top of the casing.)

The current plan consists of several steps, to begin as early as Friday, 12/23/2016 Thursday, 12/29/2016 the week of January 9, 2017:

  1. Brush casing to dislodge scale and encrustation
  2. Clear debris and fill from well by conventional air lift pumping
  3. Pitless adapter trial fit and leak test
  4. After cleaning, run a follow-up video
  5. Chlorinate well
  6. Install new well equipment, including
    • pitless adapter
    • drop pipe
    • pump
    • motor
  7. Verify well operation and water quality

Updated: 12/31/2016 9:30 AM


Well #3 In Service; Well #5 Video Inspection Complete

We were able to complete the video inspection of well #5 on Friday, 12/9/2016, and the video is being reviewed by our various experts. There were not any significant problems seen during the inspection.

Updated: 12/9/2016 5:30 PM


Well #3 In Service; Problems with #5 Video Inspection

To reduce the load on well #6, well #3 was put in service a little before noon on 12/2/2016. So the arsenic levels in your water will probably exceed limits while well #5 is out of service.

The video inspection of well #5 was started and cut short when the camera quit working at about 200′. (The well is 771′ deep.)

Updated: 12/2/2016 12:00 PM


Plan to Run Well #3 Starting Noon Friday, 12/2/2016

To avoid water shortages while our primary water source, well #5, is being repaired, at noon on Friday, December 2, we will begin supplementing water from our only active well (#6) with water from well #3. Because water from well #3 exceeds the current limits for arsenic, the arsenic levels in your water will probably exceed limits while well #5 is out of service. See the November 2016 WaterGram, distributed with water bills, and reproduced below.

Because each well feeds directly into the distribution system, there is little opportunity to mix water between wells. So all residents should expect that they will be receiving water (up to about 27 parts per billion, ppb, of arsenic) that exceeds the arsenic limit (10 ppb), for the next several weeks.

Although water from well #3 exceeds current federal and state standards, it is well within the older 50 ppb standard and was considered safe for many years. Some issues to consider:

  • Arsenic levels between 10 and 50 ppb are a potential health concern only with many years of continuous exposure.
  • Arsenic in drinking water is of no concern if you use water from a reverse osmosis (RO) system for cooking and drinking. These systems remove arsenic and most other materials.
  • You can also avoid any concerns with arsenic by using bottled water for cooking and drinking.
  • Arsenic cannot be removed by boiling.

A video inspection of well #5 is planned for Friday, 12/2/2016. From that, we will have a much better idea of the time and effort needed to put #5 back into service.

Updated 12/1/2016 11:00 AM


Well 5 Out of Service

On Tuesday, 11/29/2016, our main well, #5, was taken out of service and the pump pulled up. We ran all day on just well#6, and will do that again Wednesday. Demand appears to be more than it can provide alone.

Updated 11/30/2016 7:25 AM


Well 3 May Be Put In Service

Sometime the week of November 28, 2016, we may have to put well #3 into service on an emergency basis. This well produces arsenic above the current limits (see November 2016 WaterGram, below), so has not been used for years.

The plan is to begin inspection and rehab work on our main well, #5, starting Tuesday, November 29, 2016. The down well equipment (pump, motor, cables, pipes, etc) will be removed, and then the well service company will do a video inspection of the entire well.

Current water demand is just about what our remaining well, #6, may be able to supply. So we will try using just #6, watching it very carefully, and turn well #3 on only if necessary.

Updated: 11/28/2016 6:50 PM


Well 3 Testing

To get ready to put well #3 into service later in November, we will be running it periodically, dumping the produced water onto the ground. So do not be surprised if you see water there (64 Camino Manzano).

Updated: 11/10/2016 8 PM


(Text of November 2016 WaterGram)

We have a significant problem

The Coop has two working wells (#5 and #6). Roughly two thirds of our water comes from #5. As we have reported for several years, if something happens to well #5, we will be unable to provide adequate water to our members. This is because well #6 cannot supply sufficient water and our storage tanks only last for a few days.

Recently, we identified a problem in well #5. The source of the problem must be identified and corrected before there is damage to the well. Identifying the problem will require the removal of 500 feet of pipe, the pump, the pump motor, and the electrical cables. When this is done, a careful video inspection of the well will be necessary. Depending on the nature of the problem, it will require two weeks to as long as two months to fix the problem and put the well back in service.

Well #3

Well #3 (located in Sundance Mesa) was drilled in 1998. It can easily provide all of the Coop water needs. Unfortunately, it has about 27 parts per billion (ppb) of arsenic and it had to be taken out of service when the Federal standard for arsenic was lowered from 50 ppb to 10 ppb in 2006. Although we haven’t used this well for the last 10 years, the Coop has carefully maintained it so it can be used in case of emergency. The need to shut down and repair well #5 is such an emergency.

To ensure uninterrupted service during the repair of well #5, we will need to supplement the water from well #6 with water from well #3.

Concerns with using well #3

Although water from #3 exceeds current Federal standards, it is well within the older 50 ppb standard and was considered safe for many years. Some issues to consider:

  • Arsenic levels between 10 and 50 ppb are a potential health concern only with many years of continuous exposure.
  • Water from our wells is fed directly into the distribution system. This means that water from well #3 will be diluted by water from well #6. The amount of this dilution will vary with the total demand for water, your location in the system, and when our wells are running.
  • To the extent possible, we will minimize the use of water from well #3.
  • Arsenic in drinking water is of no concern if you use water from a reverse osmosis (RO) system for cooking and drinking. These systems remove arsenic and most other materials.
  • You can also avoid any concerns with arsenic by using bottled water for cooking and drinking.
  • Arsenic cannot be removed by boiling.

You will be notified when we turn on well #3

  • Notices will be posted on the bulletin boards by the mailboxes.
  • You will receive an e-mail if you have requested to be on the Coop e-mail list.
  • We will also send occasional e-mails and post progress information here on lamesawatercoop.org.
  • We expect to begin work on #5 in the last half of November. When work begins we will turn on #3 and use it as needed until #5 is repaired and returned to service.

Last updated 11/4/2016